Autos

Subaru XV 2.0D: Exclusive Compact SUV

2013 Subaru XV

Subaru XV 2.0D: Exclusive Compact SUV

Subaru XV 2.0D Exclusive

High above the ground, plays the coupe, but the station wagon, in a highly competitive industry, that of the compact SUVs. It is the Subaru XV , which has targeted the Volkswagen Tiguan and the Nissan Qashqai . 4.50 meters long, will be on sale in Italy at the end of January 2012 in a range of agile, which includes two petrol engines of 1.6 liters and 2 respectively with ratings of 114 and 150 hp, which is accompanied by a 2-liter turbodiesel 147 hp . The three engines are mated to a 5-speed manual transmission with reduced (1.6i), a more normal 6-speed (2.0i 2.0 D) and an automatic CVT (1.6i 2.0i). Three, finally, are available: Comfort, Trends and Exclusive with prices ranging from 21,990 to 31,990 of the 1.6i Comfort 2.0 D of Euro Exclusive.

Subaru XV 2.0D Exclusive

Subaru XV Driver’s seat:

We put ourselves behind the Subaru XV wheel right in the latter, powered by a 147 hp four-cylinder turbo diesel, the most expensive of the range and equipped Subaru XV, with six-speed manual gearbox. The driving position, comfortable, is deliberately high to give the impression of SUVs. Well the controls, setting up some great accessories and perceived quality, especially as regards the materials used.

Subaru XV 2.0D Exclusive

Subaru XV Engine:

Pressing the button to the right of the steering wheel, the boxer diesel walked without raising her voice too much, but with the vitality that is expected from a 147 hp turbo diesel Subaru XV. There are new agile, both in city traffic in both extra-urban routes, despite the four-cylinder boxer is not a sample and elastic. In the second half, in fact, proves to be a bit ‘sluggish under 1,800 rpm / min, aided by the six-speed gearbox, whose grafts are a little’ thwarted, especially in quick maneuvers.

Subaru XV 2.0D Exclusive

Subaru XV on the road:

Different matter, however, the road manners of the Subaru XV driving pleasure, in fact, is related to comfort and dynamics, thanks to the suspension which follow well the dips in the road, although they have an answer rather than bumps on the dry and short depressions. The feeling, however, is fairly tight security, due in large part to the action of the 4×4 system with center differential with viscous coupling and torque distribution of 50:50. Thus the fifteenth tackles climbs and bends in agility and with some determination. The character of this crossover Subaru also does not change even when you go to the end because it never gives the feeling of being in trouble. Entering a curve shows some understeer, but at speed it would be preferable to rely on something a little ‘more responsive and progressive.

Subaru XV – Test Drive

Comes the brand new Subaru XV in January 15, 2012, the crossover all mode the house of the Pleiades. It will make a good competition between Qasquai, ASX, Juke and ix35.

Subaru XV Price: Starting from 22,990 euros.

New Subaru XV tried in Florence

Introduced with great fanfare in the city of the lily of the Subaru XV brand new crossover,with a large test drive in Chianti, including an off road in the midst of vineyards and olive trees now bare, in a classic autumn weather, with rain and lots of mud.

The Subaru XV (an acronym for cross-vehicle) is half of all new, the fruit of Subaru started a year and a half ago with the’ Impreza XV, which has been very successful, not only among the purists of the Japanese. And so it was a short step to create a crossover that was missing to complete the range of the Pleiades.

Muscular and compact design of  Subaru XV
Rewarding and has a design trend, which directs toward a strong presence despite its compact size (4.45 x1, 78×1, 57). The proportions with a sense of elegance and lightness, while its trunk puts together a high ground clearance (22cm) to large wheels (17 “), which usually characterize the traditional midsize SUVs. In addition to the look outside, Subaru XV offers much more than just satisfaction for the eyes: superior driving performance and fuel efficiency.

The new product made ​​in Japan is characterized by the latest generation engines, combined with the traditional handling for which Subaru is famous, thanks to the all-wheel drive Subaru XV Symmetrical AWD chassis and advanced Dynamic Chassis Control Concept, two of the key technologies of the House of the Rising the east. The combination of the boxer engine with four-wheel drive system provides exceptional stability, road holding and reliability, making it safe to ride in any weather and road conditions.

The latest generation boxer engine offers a remarkable level of performance and fuel, enough to compete – in its segment – with the 2-wheel drive competitors. Traditionally associated with the benefits provided in difficult weather conditions, off-road, in the mountains and rough roads in rural areas, with the fifteenth Subaru also transfers in urban safety and driving pleasure.

Smooth ride, fuel economy and safety features of Subaru XV
Five adjectives that come to mind to describe the new Subaru XV : secure, robust, functional, reliable and youth, and for the purchase, there are four main nouns: design, price, reputation and security. Nine ways to define a total crossovere that we really liked it and recommend to friends. Just a test, for those unfamiliar with the product in general Subaru, to see if any word is wasted or overstated. But we come now to the technical data. Three verison for the European and Italian markets: 1.6i 2.0i petrol engines, and diesel 2.0D, only Boxter.

The first is the basic version with a precise balance between fuel efficiency and quick throttle response, and the second is more powerful, agile, responsive and offers a refined ride quality, providing high torque at low and mid-range for daily use and practical use situations.

The two thousand Subaru boxer diesel is the well-known, high-performance, light and fluid. Large torque available at low revs, acceleration prompt, progressive, and consumption among the best in class. The three engines developed respectively 114, 150 and 147 horses. The gasoline is equivalent to 1 .6 2.0 diesel as emissions: 146 g / km. Traditional 6-speed manual transmission for both engines, while the new Subaru XV developed a new gearbox Lineartronic CVT (continuously variable ratio), lighter and more compact. The Start & Stop device is available on the petrol range. Prices start at EUR 23 000 1 .6 to get to 32 000 for a 2.0D Exclusive, top of the range.

New Subaru XV road behavior
Subaru = Security, a combination that does not disprove anything, much less with the Subaru XV. Just a few kilometers to feel in a cell-free aseptic dangers. There is nothing that makes you perceive in advance, but the concept of security will pervades everywhere. It is accentuated when you start to dare, to take some curve with a speed not in keeping with a ramp or highway without having to slow down time. The low center of gravity thanks to the boxer engine, traction interale permeanente and four-wheel independent suspension with MacPherson struts front and rear double-wishbone, they know not to make you long skid and keep on course. Since the first error you see that the machine will never betray you.

We started with two thousand motor gasoline, for highways, roads and the center of Florence, and then forward us the FI-PI-LI (the freeway to Pisa and Livorno), and the only sound was that of perceived winter tires on the asphalt drainage . For the rest of the fifteenth row that is a pleasure, maneuvering very well in the chaotic city traffic (perfect start-stop function) on the day of the strike of public transport. A chaos from which the new entry of the Pleiades shoving it out, with its beautiful couple and acceleration gritty.

On the highway, the only thing to watch are the camera, so you know it runs without.

Second part of testing on the roads instead of Chianti, with version 2.0 diesel, always with a 6-speed manual transmission. Climbs, brow, and juggles the large network of curves in the “S”, drunk by anyone, like a sports car. No roll to upset the balance, despite a vastly supported by the knowledge of situations and places, so as to promote a deep hollow. Not to mention the asphalt perpetually bathed in a light but insistent, piogerellina.

At Castello di Gabbiano, on the heights of Mercatale, we launched the Subaru XV 2.0 diesel along a descent of nearly 2 km from the fields (a path prepared by the technicians of Subaru Europe), with muddy earth and stones, sudden hairpin turns and grooves with mud. Well the fifteenth fared so very dear, when pressed it bluntly, almost like a pure off-road. In short, a performance vehicle and secure.

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Best SUV 2011: Buying Guide for All SUV Categories Top Listings

Cadillac_Escalade_2011

Best SUV 2011 : Top Lists for all SUV Categories

Best Luxury SUV 2011

Best Luxury SUV 2011
#1 Cadillac Escalade
#2 Infiniti QX 56
#3 Mercedes-Benz GL-Class Diesel

Best Economy SUV 2011

Best Economy SUV 2011
#1 Toyota RAV4
#2 Chevrolet Equinox
#3 Honda CR-V

Best Large SUV 2011

Best Large SUV 2011
#1 Chevrolet Suburban
#2 Cadillac Escalade ESV
#3 Infiniti QX 56

Safest SUV 2011

Safest SUV 2011
#1 Chevrolet Traverse
#2 GMC Acadia
#3 Lincoln MKX

Best Small SUV 2011

Best Small SUV 2011
#1 Audi Q5
#2 GMC Terrain
#3 Mercedes-Benz GLK-Class

Fuel Efficient SUV 2011

Fuel Efficient SUV 2011
#1 Audi Q5
#2 Honda Element
#3 Mazda Tribute

Best 5 Seat SUV 2011

Best 5 Seat SUV 2011
#1 BMW X1
#2 BMW X5 M
#3 HUMMER H3

Best Family SUV 2011

Best Family SUV 2011
#1 Mazda CX-7
#2 Nissan Rogue
#3 GMC Acadia

Best Offroad SUV 2011

Best Offroad SUV 2011
#1 Ford Explorer
#2 Jeep Liberty
#3 Toyota FJ Cruiser

Best Midzise SUV 2011

Best Midzise SUV 2011
#1 Honda Pilot
#2 Hyundai Santa Fe
#3 Mazda CX-7

Best Hybrid SUV 2011

Best Hybrid SUV 2011
#1 Ford Escape Hybrid
#2 Volkswagen Touareg Hybrid
#3 Cadillac Escalade Hybrid

Best Crossover SUV 2011

Best Crossover SUV 2011
#1 Chevrolet Equinox
#2 Cadillac SRX
#3 Mercedes-Benz R-Class

Best 4WD SUV 2011

Best 4WD SUV 2011
#1 GMC Yukon Denali 4WD
#2 Chevrolet Tahoe
#3 Nissan Pathfinder

Best 7 Seat SUV 2011

Best 7 Seat SUV 2011
#1 Audi Q7
#2 Subaru Tribeca
#3 Nissan Pathfinder

Fastest SUV 2011

Fastest SUV 2011
#1 Mercedes-Benz M-Class ML63 AMG
#2 Mercedes-Benz G-Class G55 AMG
#3 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Best Towing SUV 2011

Best Towing SUV 2011
#1 Ford Expedition
#2 Toyota Sequoia
#3 Audi Q5

Best V6 SUV 2011

Best V6 SUV 2011
#1 Ford Explorer 4X4
#2 Jeep Commander
#3 Ford Taurus X

Best V8 SUV 2011

Best V8 SUV 2011
#1 Infiniti FX 50
#2 Dodge Durango Hybrid
#3 GMC Yukon 4WD

 

Best SUV 2011 – Under $25,000

#1: 2011 Chevrolet Equinox

2011 Chevrolet Equinox

#2: 2011 Honda CR-V

2011 Honda CR-V

#3: 2011 Kia Sportage

2011 Kia Sportage

 

Best SUV 2011 – Under $35,000

#1: 2011 Ford Edge

2011 Ford Edge

#2: 2011 Volvo XC60

2011 Volvo XC60

#3: 2011 Mazda CX-9

2011 Mazda CX-9

 

Best SUV 2011 – Under $45,000

#1: 2011 Buick Enclave

2011 Buick Enclave

#2: 2011 Audi Q5

2011 Audi Q5

#3: 2011 Acura MDX

2011 Acura MDX

 

Best SUV 2011 – Over $45,000

#1: 2011 Porsche Cayenne

2011 Porsche Cayenne

#2: 2011 Infiniti QX56

2011 Infiniti QX56

#3: 2011 Land Rover LR4

2011 Land Rover LR4

Hope you got your Best SUV 2011 from the above list.

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Autos

Video – Eight Ferraris in Most Costly Sports Super Car Pile-up in History

Most Costly Sports Car Pile-up in History

A luxury sports car outing in Japan has ended in what may be one of the most expensive car crashes in history.

Eight Ferraris, three Mercedes-Benzes, a Lamborghini and two other vehicles were involved in the pile-up in the southern prefecture of Yamaguchi.

No-one was seriously hurt, but the road was closed for six hours after the accident.

Media reports estimate the damaged cars are worth at least 300m yen ($3.85m; £2.46m) in total.

 The drivers were on an outing to the city of Hiroshima

The sports cars – driven in convoy by a group of automobile enthusiasts – were on their way to Hiroshima, reports Japanese newspaper The Asahi Shimbun.

Police say they believe the accident, which took place on Sunday, happened when the driver of one of the Ferraris tried to change lanes and hit the crash barrier.

“A group of cars was doing 140-160km/h (85-100mph),” an unidentified eyewitness told Japanese broadcaster TBS.

“One of them spun and they all ended up in this great mess.”

Ten people received minor injuries in the crash, police said.

They said some of the vehicles were beyond repair.

“I’ve never seen such a thing,” highway patrol lieutenant Eiichiro Kamitani told AFP news agency. “Ferraris rarely travel in such large numbers.”

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Autos

BMW X3 2012 with M Sport is Finally Redesigned to SUV Expectations

BMW X3 2012 with M Sport

BMW has finally completely redesigned its smallest SUV, the BMW X3, complete with changes inside, outside and under the hood.

BMW X3

BMW X3

BMW X3 2012 Basic Specs

Base Price $36,850
Drivetrain All Wheel Drive
Curb Weight (lbs) 4112
City (MPG) 19
Hwy (MPG) 25
Horsepower 240@6600
Torque (lb-ft) 221@2750-4000
Wheelbase 110.6
Length (in.) 183.0
Width (in.) 74.1
Height (in.) 65.4

The latest generation BMW X3 gains 3.3 inches in overall length, with an added .6 inches to the wheelbase, along with an extra 1.1 inches of width and 1.4 inches of height. Depending on the model, the new X3 still manages to shed about 50 lbs.

Thanks to the larger outer shell, passengers will gain 0.8 inches of legroom in the back row, along with another 2.8 cubic feet of storage space in the rear hatch area.

The exterior of the new model is still recognizable as an X3, albeit with a decidedly more modern look. Nothing radical here, but the X3 now shares the same basic design language as seen on BMW’s new 5- and 7-Series models.

The outgoing BMW X3 has been criticized for a sub-par interior, but BMW has addressed that issue for the new generation SUV, employing a number of high-end materials.

In the European markets, the new BMW X3launched with two trim levels — X3 xDrive20d and X3 xDrive35i. The

BMW X3 2012

BMW X3 2012

xDrive20d model features a 184 horsepower, 280 lb-ft of torque version of BMW’s 2.0-liter four-cylinder diesel. While not the powerhouse of the X3 lineup, the four-cylinder diesel is quite peppy, accelerating the X3 from 0-62 in 8.5 seconds, carrying on to a top speed of 130mph.

North American-specification BMW X3s use two familiar inline six-cylinders. Starting at $37,625, the X3 xDrive28i receives a 240-horsepower naturally-aspirated unit also used in the 328i. Stepping up to the $41,925 X3 xDrive35i adds a turbocharged unit rated at 306 horsepower and 294 lb-ft of torque, transforming the BMW X3 into a serious performer. The sprint from 0-62 takes just 5.7 seconds, with the xDrive35i topping out at 152mph.

Both powerplants are backed by BMW’s eight-speed automatic transmission, with the six-cylinder version of the BMW X3 featuring automatic stop-start technology.

Although not unveiled quite yet, BMW is expected to offer an M Sport version of the new X3. The package will come complete with a swap to 19-inch wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, an M Sport leather steering wheel and the full exterior M Sports aggressively-styled body kit.

Other final touches include a reworked interior that include new sport-minded seats with uniquely matched headliner and matching upholstery, M Sports gear selector and variable steering.

Although not standard, M Sports-equipped BMW X3‘s will also have an available exclusive color: Carbon Black Metallic.

The 2012 BMW X3 begins production in September (and will end in March 2012). Details have now been released on changes for the 2012 model year for the US. We detail it below:

New Standard Equipment:
– Black high gloss finish on instrument panel
– Floor mats
– Panoramic moonroof for xDrive35i

Optional Equipment Changes:
– Convenience Package deleted on xDrive35i. Contents become part of Premium Package
– Cold Weather Package loses heated rear seats and retractable headlight washers, which are now available as part of Cold Weather Package II (which requires ordering of Cold Weather Package)
– New Premium Sound Package (SIRIUS 1 yr and premium hi-fi system)
– Sport Activity Packages (ZAP) now feature Anthracite headliner. 19″ wheels (2A1 with all-season tires) now included for ZAP on xDrive35i

Stand-alone Options Changes:
– Heated front seats available as stand-alone option
– Heated steering wheel deleted as stand-alone option and offered in new Cold Weather Package
– 19″ Style 309 wheels deleted as stand-alone option and offered in Sport Activity Package

MSRP Pricing (effective October 1, 2011):

Base (US entry):
x3 xDrive28i – $36,850
x3 xDrive35i – $42,400
* Destination & handling – $875

Packages:

ZAP – Sport Activity Package (xDrive28i) – $1,550
— Sports leather steering wheel
— 18″ light alloy V spoke wheels – style 307 with all-season run-flat tires
— Roof rails in aluminum satin
— X-Line exterior trim package
— Sports seats
— Anthracite headliner

ZAP – Sport Activity Package (xDrive35i) – $1,750
— 19″ light alloy double spoke wheels – style 309 with all-season run-flat tires
— Sport automatic transmission with shift paddles
— Sports leather steering wheel with paddle shifters
— Roof fails in Aluminum Satin
— X-Line exterior trim package
— Sports seats
— Anthracite headeliner

ZCV – Convenience Package (xDrive28i) – $1,700
— Power tailgate
— Comfort Access keyless entry
— Rear manual side window shades
— Xenon headlights
— Adaptive light control

ZCW – Cold Weather Package (xDrive28i / xDrive35i) – $700
— Heated steering wheel
— Split fold-down-rear seat
— Heated front seats

ZCX – Cold Weather Package II (xDrive28i / xDrive35i) – $450
— Heated rear seats
— Retractable headlight washers
* ZCX requires ordering ZCW

ZMP – M Sport Package (xDrive28i) – $3,000
— Sport suspension delete
— 18″ M light alloy star spoke wheels – style 368M with all-season run-flat tire
— Performance Control
— M Sport Package
— High-gloss Roof Rails
— Sport seats
— Aerodynamic kit
— Shadowline exterior trim
— Anthracite headliner
* ZMP cannot be ordered with ZAP
* ZMP requires ordering ZPP

ZMP – M Sport Package (xDrive35i) – $3,000
— Sport suspension delete
— 19″ M light alloy double spoke wheels – style 369M with all-season run-flat tire
— Sport automatic transmission with shift paddles
— Performance Control
— M Sport Package
— High-gloss Roof Rails
— Sport seats
— Aerodynamic kit
— Shadowline exterior trim
— Anthracite headliner
— M Sports leather steering wheel with paddle shifters
* ZMP cannot be ordered with ZAP
* ZMP requires ordering ZPP

ZPP – Premium Package (xDrive28i) – $3,450
— Universal garage-door opener
— Panoramic moonroof
— Auto-dimming interior and exterior mirrors
— Auto-dimming rearview mirror
— Lumbar support
— Storage package
— Ambience lighting
— Nevada leather

ZPP – Premium Package (xDrive35i) – $3,450
— Power tailgate
— Universal garage-door opener
— Comfort Access keyless entry
— Rear manual side window shades
— Auto-dimming interior and exterior mirrors
— Auto-dimming rearview mirror
— Lumbar support
— Storage package
— Ambience lighting
— Nevada leather

ZPS – Premium Sound Package (xDrive28i / xDrive35i) – $950
— Satellite radio with 1 year subscription
— Premium hi-fi-system

ZTP – Technology Package (xDrive28i / xDrive35i) – $3,200
— Rear View Camera with Top View
— Park Distance Control
— Navigation system
— Online Information Services
— BMW Assist with enhanced Bluetooth and USB
— Real Time Traffic Information
* ZTP requires ordering ZPP

ZDH – Dynamic Handling Package (xDrive28i / xDrive35i) – $1,400
— Dynamic Damper Control
— Performance Control
— Variable sport steering
* In combination with ZMP – $1,300

Options:
Rear-view camera – $400
Roof rails in Aluminum Satin – $250 (included in ZAP package)
Panoramic moonroof – $1,350 (included in xDrive28i ZPP package / standard in xDrive35i)
Cargo net – $180
Heated front seats – $500 (included in ZCW package)
Park Distance Control – $750 (included in ZTP package)
Xenon headlights – $900 (included in xDrive28i ZCV package / standard in xDrive35i)
Navigation system – $2,150 (included in ZTP package)
Sirius 1 year subscription – $350 (included in ZPS package)
BMW Assist with enhanced Bluetooth and USB – $650 (included in ZTP package)
BMW Apps – $250

Priority 1 Options:
— Power Tailgate – $500 (included in xDrive28i ZCV package / xDrive35i ZPP package)
— Comfort Access keyless entry – $500 (included in xDrive28i ZCV package / xDrive35i ZPP package)
— Rear manual side window shades – $250 (included in xDrive28i ZCV package / xDrive35i ZPP package)
— Split fold-down-rear seat – $200 (included in ZCW package)
— Automatic high beams – $250 (requires ordering ZPP package)
— Head-up Display – $1,300

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CarSales NSW: Get Best Value to Buy or Sell your Used or New Car

CarSales NSW

CarSales NSW

CarSales NSW

Find new or used cars in New South Wales – NSW for sale/buy locally, in New South Wales, or anywhere within Australia. Search through comprehensive new/used cars in CarSales NSWs range of new car models to find the new model you are looking for.

Read reviews of the latest new cars in New South Wales, including colour photos, detailed mechanical, safety, comfort, fuel economy, emissions, and luxury information on every new & used car in New South Wales – NSW for sale/buy, all designed to make it easier for you to drive away in the new car in New South Wales of your dreams.

Searching for your next new or used car in New South Wales is easy on CarSales NSW, with listings of new cars in New South Wales – NSW for sale from the largest range of car dealers, stocking all the major models in New South Wales including Bathurst/Orange, Campbelltown/Camden, Central Coast, Central Eastern, Dubbo and Western Plains, Far North Coast, Hunter/Newcastle, Illawarra, Mid North Coast, North Coast, North Eastern, North West, Northern Rivers, Penrith and Blue Mountains, Snowy Mountains, South Coast, South Eastern, Southern Highlands, Sydney East, Sydney Metro, Sydney North, Sydney South, Sydney West, Windsor/Richmond and many more.

New cars in New South Wales – NSW for sale

  • JAGUAR XF Base X250 MY11 – sedan, 2011

    Find out more about this JAGUAR XF Base X250 MY11 SEDAN 2011

    2011 JAGUAR XF Base X250 MY11 SEDAN, featuring 4 drs, L (6 cylinder) engine, Sports Automatic transmission, 30 kms, NSW

    MY11 SALE ON NOW. WAS $151,500 and NOW $126,990. LIMITED EDITION XF S 3.0LTR V6 Diesel with 600Nm of Power. To enhance this already well sophisticated model we have added Dynamic Suspension with 20 inch Shadow Chrome Volan alloy wheels for the sports enthusiast , USB an…

    $126,990

    Find out more about this JAGUAR XF Base X250 MY11 SEDAN 2011

  • HYUNDAI IX35 ACTIVE LM MY11 – wagon, 2011

    Find out more about this HYUNDAI IX35 ACTIVE LM MY11 WAGON 2011

    2011 HYUNDAI IX35 ACTIVE LM MY11 WAGON, featuring 4 drs, L (4 cylinder) engine, Sports Automatic transmission, 0 kms, NSW

    VEHICLE IS IN STOCK AND AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY NOW. 8YR WARRANTY 4YR ROAD SIDE PLAN BEST FINANCE RATES IN SYDNEY

    $28,480

    Find out more about this HYUNDAI IX35 ACTIVE LM MY11 WAGON 2011

  • FORD FIESTA LX WT – hatchback, 2010

    Find out more about this FORD FIESTA LX WT HATCHBACK 2010

    2010 FORD FIESTA LX WT HATCHBACK, featuring 5 drs, 1.6L (4 cylinder) engine, Manual transmission, 0 kms, NSW

    $19,990

    Find out more about this FORD FIESTA LX WT HATCHBACK 2010

  • CHERY J11 2WD T1X – wagon, 2011

    Find out more about this CHERY J11 2WD T1X WAGON 2011

    2011 CHERY J11 2WD T1X WAGON, featuring 5 drs, 2.0L (4 cylinder) engine, Manual transmission, 0 kms, QLD

    CHERY The new exciting car company has ARRIVED!!Only five minutes from the Gold Coast Airport. One of the Tweed Coast’s most awarded dealer’s is offering an exclusive 6 YEAR / 175,000 klm dealer warranty with every new purchase. Why would you pick anything else.

    $17,925

    Find out more about this CHERY J11 2WD T1X WAGON 2011

  • LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER SPORT TDV6 LUXURY L320 11MY – wagon, 2011

    Find out more about this LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER SPORT TDV6 LUXURY L320 11MY WAGON 2011

    2011 LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER SPORT TDV6 LUXURY L320 11MY WAGON, featuring 4 drs, L (6 cylinder) engine, Sports Automatic transmission, 10 kms, NSW

    *** 2011 Model year run out*** 2011 Model year run out*** Enquire today for the deal of the day!!! Now available for immediate delivery, this sensational Range Rover Sport. Powered by the 3.0 twin turbo diesel this car has the power, the looks and the style to fit in t…

    $116,211

    Find out more about this LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER SPORT TDV6 LUXURY L320 11MY WAGON 2011

  • FORD TERRITORY TS SEQ SPORT SHIFT RWD SZ – wagon, 2011

    Find out more about this FORD TERRITORY TS SEQ SPORT SHIFT RWD SZ WAGON 2011

    2011 FORD TERRITORY TS SEQ SPORT SHIFT RWD SZ WAGON, featuring 4 drs, 2.7L (6 cylinder) engine, Sports Automatic transmission, 0 kms, NSW

    Vehicle is a company demonstrator travelled less than 1500km

    $49,990

    Find out more about this FORD TERRITORY TS SEQ SPORT SHIFT RWD SZ WAGON 2011

  • MITSUBISHI TRITON GLX-R DOUBLE CAB MN MY11 – utility, 2011

    Find out more about this MITSUBISHI TRITON GLX-R DOUBLE CAB MN MY11 UTILITY 2011

    2011 MITSUBISHI TRITON GLX-R DOUBLE CAB MN MY11 UTILITY, featuring 4 drs, 2.5L (4 cylinder) engine, Manual transmission, 10 kms, NSW

    MY11 Triton GLX-R comes with Australia’s best new car warranty, capped price servicing and customer care. Super trade in’s, finance to suit any budget, just ask! ***ABN Price***

    $42,888

    Find out more about this MITSUBISHI TRITON GLX-R DOUBLE CAB MN MY11 UTILITY 2011

 

Used cars in New South Wales – NSW for sale

  • BMW 650i STEPTRONIC E64 MY08 – convertible, 2008

    Find out more about this BMW 650i STEPTRONIC E64 MY08 CONVERTIBLE 2008

    2008 BMW 650i STEPTRONIC E64 MY08 CONVERTIBLE, featuring 2 drs, 4.8L (8 cylinder) engine, Automatic transmission, 45000 kms, NSW

    THIS 650i COMES WITH ALL THE ADDED EXTRA’S YOU CAN GET, ONE OWNER, FULL SERVICE HISTORY

    $164,990*

     

    Find out more about this BMW 650i STEPTRONIC E64 MY08 CONVERTIBLE 2008

  • AUDI S5 QUATTRO 8T MY10 – coupe, 2010

    Find out more about this AUDI S5 QUATTRO 8T MY10 COUPE 2010

    2010 AUDI S5 QUATTRO 8T MY10 COUPE, featuring 2 drs, 4.2L (8 cylinder) engine, Automatic transmission, 16250 kms, NSW

    Fantastic looking car with amazing performance. This is one car the will turn the heads.

    $124,990*

     

    Find out more about this AUDI S5 QUATTRO 8T MY10 COUPE 2010

  • CHEVROLET CAMARO – coupe, 1967

    Find out more about this CHEVROLET CAMARO   COUPE 1967

    1967 CHEVROLET CAMARO COUPE, featuring 2 drs, 350L (8 cylinder) engine, Manual transmission, 70 kms, NSW

    —–Resto Mod —- Best of both worlds, modern engineering and performance with classic style, a real super muscle car. Very rare opportunity, very few cars have ever been built like this.

    $79,990*

     

    Find out more about this CHEVROLET CAMARO   COUPE 1967

  • MERCEDES CLC200 KOMPRESSOR EVOLUTION CL203 – coupe, 2010

    Find out more about this MERCEDES CLC200 KOMPRESSOR EVOLUTION CL203 COUPE 2010

    2010 MERCEDES CLC200 KOMPRESSOR EVOLUTION CL203 COUPE, featuring 2 drs, 1.8L (4 cylinder) engine, Automatic transmission, 13460 kms, QLD

    Immaculate CLC200 Evolution. Finished in Calcite White with a two tone sports interior, Panoramic Glass Tilt / Slide Sunroof, 18inch Alloy wheels and much more. Call today to arrange a closer inspection of this sporty coupe. Nationwide delivery available

    $53,990

    Drive Away No More to Pay

    Find out more about this MERCEDES CLC200 KOMPRESSOR EVOLUTION CL203 COUPE 2010

  • BMW 323i STEPTRONIC E90 MY10 – sedan, 2010

    Find out more about this BMW 323i STEPTRONIC E90 MY10 SEDAN 2010

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    2008 CHRYSLER CROSSFIRE SRT-6 ZH MY2005 ROADSTER, featuring 2 drs, 3.2L (6 cylinder) engine, Automatic transmission, 8374 kms, NSW

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* If the price does not contain the notation that it is “Drive Away No More to Pay”, the price may not include additional costs, such as stamp duty and other government charges. Please confirm price and features with the seller of the vehicle.

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Triumph Tiger 800 XC vs BMW F 800 GS: Comparing the Adventure Tourers

Triumph Tiger 800 XC vs BMW F 800 GS Comparison

Triumph Tiger 800

Triumph Tiger 800 vs BMW F800GS

From the minute it arrived, BMW’s F800GS looked like just the right motorcycle for all the wonderfully horrible little routes most of America couldn’t care less about. Good pavement, bad pavement or no pavement at all, it’s at least 80 lbs. lighter and $3500 less expensive than the archetypical R1200GS, gets phenomenal gas mileage and, with a set of street-legal knobbies levered on, is less likely to stumble on the sort of terrain that would give your average Rocky Mountain Goat a nasty case of shin splints. BMW Motorrad has had that lucrative little chunk of real estate pretty much to itself for the past few years, but not anymore.

Enter Triumph’s Tiger 800 XC, as in “cross-country,” bolder brother of the new Tiger 800. Even a quick glance tells you it has nothing at all to do with Hinckley’s previous Tigers. Another reveals a load of superficial similarities with BMW’s mid-size GS: 21-inch front and 17-inch rear wire-spoke wheels, 45mm inverted fork, molded clear-plastic windscreen, steel-trellis chassis, cast-aluminum swingarm. The differences between Triumph’s interpretation of the perfect do-it-all middleweight and BMW’s are right there in Phantom Black and Alpine White.

The biggest mechanical divide lies between the 798cc Rotax-built parallel-twin hanging in the BMW’s frame and Triumph’s own 799cc triple. Both lumps provide foundations for other engines in their maker’s respective lineups. Both have been specifically configured for all-surface duty. Either one will take you (almost) anywhere you’d like to go. But while the German twin is methodical, efficient and admirably effective most of the time, the carefully massaged long-stroke version of what powers Triumph’s 675cc Daytona and Street Triple encourages a more enthusiastic approach to everything on the map.

Easing out of the luxuriously appointed MC M.C. garage for a little stream-of-consciousness exploring, the BMW sounds and feels exactly like what it is: 68 percent of Das Boxer. Practical. Purposeful. Determined. As sporting street transport, it’s somewhere between dull and boring. Meanwhile, a thumb on the Tiger’s starter incites what sounds like a hive of riled-up hornets. Take the time to listen and what comes out of each bike’s exhaust tells you a lot about its mechanical soul—or lack thereof.

Feeling taller, longer and narrower between your knees, the GS mutters through any urban landscape with a deadpan power delivery, inevitable German efficiency … and about the same riveting excitement as Friedrich Nietzsche at a church picnic. Still, what it does, it does well. Aside from sticky shifting and a less-than-sumptuous seat, there aren’t many practical nits to pick.

That same hard-headed, left-brain approach reveals a few more flaws in the Tiger’s persona. It runs hot in slow going. A touchy, occasionally grabby clutch and lean off-idle fueling add up to stalling unless you leave green lights with a few more revs. Our XC came with a faintly spongy front brake and without ABS; add $800 for that option if you’re so inclined. Still, the Triumph is more than a match for the BMW as practical daily transport.

Bmw F800gs Still

Sitting taller than the Tiger
Bmw F800gs Crankshaft

Narrow enough to pass for…
Bmw F800gs Instrument Panel

The GS’s instruments offer a more complete range of data than the Tiger’s, but the handlebar clamp isn’t adjustable for off-road excursions and that potato-chip windscreen offers little protection.

The rev-happy triple carves a quicker, more enjoyable swath through the dreaded Wednesday-morning commute. It’s perfectly content to meander along on a whiff of throttle, or lunge out of trouble with a big handful. Despite carrying 7 lbs. more than the GS, the XC feels lighter on its feet around town. It shifts gears with less effort. Above 5000 rpm, every handful of throttle stirs up satisfying acceleration, accompanied by rising four-part harmonies from an increasingly insistent hornet squadron. Though it pulls as dutifully as the twin down low, the triple is much more responsive anywhere on the tach face, happily digesting regular 87-octane unleaded instead of the pricier 89-octane mid-grade BMW recommends. To its credit, the GS is capable of wringing 50-plus miles from every gallon when you’re feeling economical.

That’s enough to go 200 miles between fuel stops, assuming your gluteal pain threshold is calibrated for 3 hours on a narrow, scantily upholstered seat that can induce monkey-butt in 59 minutes. There’s not much in the way of passing power at 70 mph in sixth, and wearisome high-frequency vibes begin to intrude at 75. The rider is carried higher and farther forward, so there’s less room for long arms between the handlebar and seat. Concise inseam? Opt for the optional “low” version. Over in the plus column, the GS’s trip computer lets you toggle through a broader selection of relevant data on its LCD panel without squinting or steering with one hand. Wind protection is marginal on both bikes, and the BMW’s windscreen is a notch below that. Heated handgrips—part of our 800’s Standard Package, along with ABS and that nifty trip computer—are second only to hot coffee on cold mornings, but they’re not so hot without handguards, which will add another $165 to the bottom line. Meanwhile, the Triumph is a comfortable enough place to spend a day or three. Noticeably smoother between 70 and 75 mph despite spinning 500 rpm faster, the counterbalanced triple can be nearly as stingy with the petrol, and its relatively luxurious, height-adjustable seat only starts to wear thin after the second or third tank.

Roll off into your favorite tangle of bends and the Tiger takes charge. Armed with a broader band of convincing acceleration from 6000 rpm to the 10K redline and quicker, more accurate steering, it snaps in and out of the most diabolically technical corners in less time with less effort. While its engine is busy winning all those little corner-to-corner sprints, the Triumph’s chassis remains calm and composed, even at a pace that has its Bridgestone Battle Wing tires struggling for grip. The BMW can match that pace as long as you’re willing to work for it. Just keep the tach needle in its happy place between 7000 and 8500 rpm and bully a longer, lazier chassis that kneels on its squishy fork every time you squeeze the front brake.

The order changes once you delve into one of those less-traveled ribbons of dirt or crumbling blacktop. Then, things get a little more … interesting. Despite significant advances in motorcycle engineering and brochure writing, the 500-lb. dirtbike is still an awkward oxymoron. Either bike will go further and faster on more technical terrain once shod with suitable off-road rubber. As delivered, both of our mid-sized adventurers were happier on some mix of rough pavement and 4×4-friendly trails, but the BMW was more capable where Jeep Wranglers fear to tread.

Carrying fuel in a molded plastic tank under the seat makes the GS feel narrower between your knees and lighter than it really is. This is a good thing. Dry-sump engine architecture helps put 9.6 inches of daylight between vulnerable bits and heartless terrain vs. the Tiger’s 8.1 inches; that could be the difference between gliding over that next rock/log/rut and bashing into it. The German bike’s suspension copes with genuinely evil terrain a bit better, and its incremental power delivery helps that rear Pirelli get a grip in the slipperier stuff. But as good as it is in the middle of nowhere, the BMW always manages to paint the ride an apathetic shade of beige everywhere else.

Triumph Tiger 800 Xc Main
The Tiger feels huge at first, especially with a full tank of gas. Burn a gallon or so and it shrinks a half-size. Quicker steering counteracts most of that top-heavy feel. An obliging triple that makes 96 percent of peak torque at 2900 rpm takes care of the rest. On top of that, there’s more room to move around, which means you’re more likely to be standing up on the pegs as God and Gaston Rahier intended when another evil crevasse tries to inhale the front wheel. For those who’d rather stand anyway, a crafty adjustable clamp moves the handlebar 8.5mm higher and 18mm forward for dirt use. That hair-trigger clutch is either aggravating or powerful motivation to carry just a little more speed up the next shale-infested climb. It’s also one more reason to like the GS if you figure pavement is just a quicker way of getting to the dirt without tie-downs and a pickup truck.

For everybody else, choosing between these two comes down to that stuff that pulls you out of bed ahead of the alarm on a Saturday morning faster than a whiff of Starbucks Gold Coast Blend. The same stuff that makes you ride to work in the rain when there’s a perfectly good car in the garage. Psychopharmacologists call it dopamine. We call it fun. Triumph’s new Tiger 800 XC serves up more of that deliciously addictive stuff on just about any surface than the BMW F800GS. The fact that it’s a little faster, a lot more comfortable and conspicuously less expensive seals the deal. So if you’re looking for something to reconnoiter the oft-overlooked roads that can paint a big, goofy smile on your face, ride the Tiger.

Triumph Tiger 800 Xc Still

The Tiger’s engine rides closer…
  read full caption
Triumph Tiger 800 Xc Crankshaft

Essentially a stroked version…
  read full caption
Triumph Tiger 800 Xc Instruments

The Triumph’s instruments…

Though the BMW R1200GS may be my favorite motorcycle of all time, I usually recuse myself from any discussion of its little brother by citing our irreconcilable differences. Less, in this case, is exactly that.

After surviving roughly 37.5 near-death experiences on ye olde liter-sized Triumph Tiger, I had my doubts about the allegedly more dirt-worthy 800. Not anymore.

This one only tried to hurt me once, and that was because my right hand wrote an 80-horsepower check the rear Pirelli couldn’t cash. The fact that Triumph’s 494-lb. mallet didn’t drive me into the ground like an XXL tent peg says more about what it does right than anything else.

I’ve ridden the Tiger with proper off-road rubber. It’s still short on ground clearance and adequate undercarriage protection. But unlike the F800GS, the 800XC is fun to ride almost anywhere. Spend the grand or so you save buying British on a few off-road requisites, and who knows? This one has the potential to bump the R1200GS off the top of my list.


First things first: These two adventurers are not dirtbikes! Yes, they’re smaller and lighter than an R1200GS, but they’re still twice as heavy as a proper motocrosser. You don’t know what “out of shape” means until you’ve got a 500-lb. “dual-sport” crossways on a singletrack trail, surveying the local fauna and (very sharp) flora for a soft place to land! As some dirty guy named Harry once warned: “A man’s got to know his limitations.” And those of his steed.

With those caveats in place, I like both of these bikes for different reasons. The Triumph’s three-cylinder engine has soul, and if I were in the market for a two-wheeled Range Rover, it’d be my first choice.

If I were looking for a two-wheeled Jeep, however, I’d pick the BMW. It’s no KTM Adventure, but it’s almost as capable off-road. The “little” GS may never equal its big brother’s globe-trotting capabilities or otherworldly popularity, but it’s no less worthy of the letters on its flanks. And of your attention—it definitely got mine.

 

2011 Bmw F800gs

2011 BMW F800GS | Price: $13,075
Dyno
BMW’s twin-cylinder pump puts out a bit more torque from the bottom up. Effective? Absolutely. Exciting? Not so much. The GS is actually stronger through the midrange, but those revs build gradually and power production tapers off beyond 8200 rpm.
Tech Spec
Engine type:  l-c parallel-twin
Valve train:  DOHC, 8v
Displacement:  798cc
Bore x stroke:  82.0 x 75.6mm
Compression:  12.0:1
Fuel system:  EFI
Clutch:  Wet, multi-plate
Transmission:  6-speed
Frame:  Tubular-steel trellis with aluminum swingarm
Front suspension:  Marzocchi 45mm inverted fork
Rear suspension:  Sachs shock with remote adjustable spring preload and rebound damping
Front brake:  Dual Brembo two-piston calipers, 300mm discs with ABS
Rear brake:  Brembo single-piston caliper, 265mm disc with ABS
Front tire:  90/90R-21 Pirelli Scorpion Trail
Rear tire:  150/70R-17 Pirelli Scorpion Trail
Rake/trail:  23.1°/3.6 in.
Seat height:  34.6 in.
Wheelbase:  62.1 in.
Fuel capacity:  4.2 gal.
Weight (tank full/empty):  487/462 lbs.
Measured horsepower:   74.5 bhp @ 8200 rpm
Measured torque:   50.9 lb.-ft. @ 5500 rpm
Corrected ¼-mile:   12.36 sec @ 107.20 mph
Top-gear roll-on, 60-80 mph:  3.3 sec.
Fuel mileage (high/low/avg.):   54/36/44 mpg
Colors:  Orange, white
Available:  Now
Warranty:  2 yrs., unlimited mi.
Contact:  BMW of North America
P.O. Box 1227
Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677
800.831.1117
www.bmwmotorcycles.com

2011 Bmw F800gs Graph

Ergos
The BMW’s sculpted seat carries you farther from the ground, describing a more compact triangle between hands, feet and butt than the Triumph’s. Compact riders wish the earth was closer, while tall ones wish the seat and bar were farther apart.


Triumph Tiger 800 Xc

2011 Triumph Tiger 800 XC | Price: $10,999
Dyno
Don’t let the 10,000-rpm redline fool you. This new triple makes nearly as much torque as its twin-cylinder opponent for the first 5000 rpm. More horsepower and a more eager persona take it from there, laying down a decisive advantage above 8100 rpm.
Tech Spec
Engine type:  l-c inline-triple
Valve train:  DOHC, 12v
Displacement:  799cc
Bore x stroke:  74.0 x 61.9mm
Compression:  12.0:1
Fuel system:  EFI
Clutch:  Wet, multi-plate
Transmission:  6-speed
Frame:  Tubular-steel trellis with aluminum swingarm
Front suspension:  Showa 45mm inverted fork
Rear suspension:  Showa shock with adjustable spring preload and rebound damping
Front brake:  Dual Nissin two-piston calipers, 308mm discs
Rear brake:  Nissin single-piston caliper, 255mm disc
Front tire:  90/90R-21 Bridgestone Battle Wing
Rear tire:  150/70R-17 Bridgestone Battle Wing
Rake/trail:  23.1°/3.6 in.
Seat height:  33.3 in.
Wheelbase:  61.7 in.
Fuel capacity:  5.0 gal.
Weight (tank full/empty):  494/464 lbs.
Measured horsepower:   79.2 bhp @ 9300 rpm
Measured torque:   48.6 lb.-ft. @ 7700 rpm
Corrected ¼-mile:   12.07 sec. @ 111.13 mph
Top-gear roll-on, 60-80 mph:  3.1 sec.
Fuel mileage (high/low/avg.):   48/38/41 mpg
Colors:  Black, orange, white
Available:  Now
Warranty:  2 yrs., unlimited mi.
Contact:  Triumph Motorcycles America
385 Walt Sanders Memorial Dr. #100
Newnan, GA 30265
678.854.2010
www.triumphmotorcycles.com

Triumph Tiger 800 Xc Dyno

Ergos
Triumph’s lower seat and pegs come at the expense of ground clearance, which only matters in the dirt. The net result is an instinctive riding posture with more room where it matters, plus easy adjustments for seat height and handlebar position.

 

Comparing Three Adventure Tourers
Triumph Tiger 800 Triumph Tiger 800XC BMW F 800 GS
Engine Type Liquid-cooled, DOHC, inline, 3-cylinder Liquid-cooled, DOHC, inline, 3-cylinder Liquid-cooled, DOHC, parallel twin-cylinder
Displacement 799cc 799cc 798cc
Bore & Stroke 74mm x 61.9mm 74mm x 61.9mm 82mm x 75.6mm
Compression 11.0:1 11.0:1 12.0:1
HP (BHP or Rear Wheel) 94 bhp @ 9300 rpm (claimed) 94 bhp @ 9300 rpm (claimed) 85 bhp @ 7500 rpm (claimed)
Torque 58 lb-ft @ 7850 (claimed) 58 lb-ft @ 7850 (claimed) 62 lb-ft @ 5750 (claimed)
Frame Tubular Steel Trellis Tubular Steel Trellis Tubular Steel Space Frame
Wheelbase 61.2 in 61.7 in 62.1 in
Rake/Trail 23.7°/86.2mm 23.1°/91.1mm 26.0°/117mm
Front Suspension Showa 43mm upside down fork, 180mm travel Showa 45mm upside down fork, 220mm travel 45mm upside down fork, 230mm of travel
Rear Suspension Showa monoshock, preload adjustment, 170 mm travel Showa monoshock, remote reservoir, preload adjustment, 215 mm travel Monoshock, preload and rebound adjustment, 215mm travel
Front Wheel 19 in x 2.5 in 21 in x 2.5 in 21 in x 2.5 in
Rear Wheel 17 in x 4.25 in 17 in x 4.25 in 17 in x 4.25 in
Tires Front: 110/80 ZR19 Rear: 150/70 R17 Front: 90/90 ZR21 Rear: 150/70 R17 Front: 90/90 21 Rear: 150/70 17
Front Brakes Twin two-piston Nissin calipers with 308mm discs Twin two-piston Nissin calipers with 308mm discs Twin two-piston calipers with 300mm discs
Rear Brakes Single Nissin caliper with 225mm disc Single Nissin caliper with 225mm disc Single piston caliper with 265mm disc
Weight Wet: 462 lbs Wet: 473 lbs Wet: 455 lbs
Seat Height 31.9 in/32.7 in 32.2 in/34.0 in 33.5 in/34.6 in
MSRP $9,999 $10,999 $11,445

 

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Triumph Tiger 800 and Tiger 800XC: 2011 models comes with 800cc off-road prowess

Triumph Tiger 800 and Tiger 800XC : New 2011 Models

Triumph Tiger 800

Triumph Tiger 800

2011 Tiger 800 and Tiger 800XC tripled  Triumph’s adventure-touring line-up. The three-cylinder Tiger 800s intensify the off-road prowess of the old Tiger’s capabilities and deliver a warning shot across the bow of BMW’s F800GS.

Whereas the Tiger 1050 is more of a sport-touring rig with long-travel suspension competing against the likes of Ducati’s Multistrada 1200, the new Tiger 800s are constructed to attack and conquer unpaved elements. To illustrate the measure of the newest Tiger’s off-road intentions Triumph invited a group of moto-journalists to a two-day ride that would challenge the Tigers on the street and in the dirt.

The morning of the event Triumph’s media liaison, Reg Kittrelle, shocked the attending press by announcing at breakfast we’d be spending the following night beneath the stars in a (insert gasp here) tent. “It’s all a part of the adventure-touring experience,” he said, attempting to assuage our discomfort at the idea roughing it for a night in the wilds of San Diego County.

Sure, the presence of Triumph North America CEO, Greg Heichelbech, kept the group of pampered moto-journalists from pooh-poohing the inhumane conditions, but apprehensions remained. Kittrelle avoided journalistic mutiny by announcing there’d be a catered BBQ accompanied by our selection of campfire beer.

Before embarking on our exploration of SoCal’s outback, Triumph’s Chris Langlois refocused the group on the job before us by explaining the distinctions between the slightly more streetable Tiger 800 and the 800XC’s dirt-oriented components. The dissimilar attributes include the spoked, 21/17-inch front/rear wheel combo of the XC vs. the 19/17-inch setup of the standard 800’s alloy wheels; the XC’s fork that is 2mm larger in diameter and offers 1.6 inches more travel; and other differences including rear suspension, seat height, handlebar width, wet weight, etc. (see comparison spec sheet).

The spec sheet also reveals technical differences between the Tiger and the F800GS such as 10mm more front suspension travel for the GS compared to the Tiger XC, an 18-lb weight advantage for the BMW (7 lbs compared to the standard Tiger), a 9-hp advantage for the Triumph but 4 ft-lbs more torque for the GS.

Triumph Tiger 800

Triumph Tiger 800

What this information conveys regarding the better choice of motorcycle between the two competing brands I’m not sure, because, although I thunk it a good idea, Triumph didn’t share my wisdom when it came to providing an F800GS for us to ride. Hopefully, our requisition to BMW for an F800GS will soon be answered and we can complete this destiny.

However, of the two Tiger models, after multiple days and hundreds of miles on both, I’m now an authority on the intricacies on either model’s handling and performance. The insight I possess is so grand this story could become the Dianetics of adventure-touring articles. But before I get all L. Ron Hubbard, allow me to abridge my knowledge with this condensed version of the details: The XC is taller and handles better in the dirt.

Short and sweet but also the truth. What gives the XC a taller seat height (longer travel suspension and a larger front wheel) is also what provides the XC with better off-road manners. In addition to the aforementioned dirt-specific components, the XC gets an upgraded rear shock that boasts 1.8 inches more travel than the standard Tiger, a remote reservoir and rebound adjustability. The XC’s handlebar is also 2.7 inches wider, which goes a long way in providing better leverage during off-road riding applications.

With this in mind it’s no surprise the XC is capable of absorbing larger off-road obstacles than the standard Tiger, but unless you’re riding at speed through terrain more serious than a fire road, the standard Tiger is probably sufficient for your off-road purposes. As a person who’s ridden sportbikes across terra firma similar to what we encountered in San Diego county (albeit at a slower speed), I may not be the best gauge, but I was equally happy on the standard Tiger whether it was paralleling the Mexican border on an undulating dirt road or carving paved switchbacks outside Julian, CA.

Although the XC’s surplus suspension travel had it diving more during aggressive road riding, it wasn’t as severe as I feared. In fact, both the XC and standard Tiger exhibited a well-balanced suspension package that kept the bikes from teetering back and forth when braking and accelerating.

A notable and expensive deficiency spotlighted during our outing wasn’t the bike itself, but rather its accessories. The visually rugged saddlebags ($800) are seemingly built to withstand a Dakar-esque get-off, and I liked their lockable, easy-on, easy-off design that will appeal to commuters. But a component is only as strong as its weakest part, and on these saddlebags it’s the attachment point. Twice I witnessed bags break off of fellow journalist bikes during slow-speed, front-end washouts in the dirt. Off-road warriors will wish for more robust mounts.

Triumph Tiger 800

Triumph Tiger 800

Kudos are merited for the Tiger’s new 799cc engine, which is based on Triumph’s lovable 675cc Triple. Exhibiting lots of low-end and mid-range grunt, the inline three-cylinder engine is even more impressive for its lack of vibration. Not once during my two-hour freeway ride to and from San Diego did I feel the need to remove my throttlehand from the bar in order to shake out the tingles and restore blood flow. Yeah, it’s that smooth.

Another nicety is the adjustable seat on both model Tigers. Increasing or decreasing the seat height on either is a simple process of removing the seat and repositioning the height bar and returning the seat to its position on the bike. Why more motorcycle seats do not provide a seat adjustment this simple is a mystery.

What I didn’t appreciate was the unendearing resonance of a spittoon echo emanating from the catalytic converter. This Jiffy Pop pinging sound was present on each Tiger I rode, but under acceleration on certain bikes the sound became a ceramic warble that pierced my earplugs around 7000 rpm. Only certain bikes emitted this sound, while others didn’t, and some journos didn’t even hear the noise, so it seems as if this noise occurrence may be a vagary.

Triumph Tiger 800

Triumph Tiger 800

So, to reiterate the emphasis of the two Tigers I’ll venture to say that for the dirtbiker looking for something street-legal, the Tiger XC is the ticket, while the sportbike guy craving some off-road action will probably feel more at home on the standard Tiger. The standard Tiger retails for $1,000 less than the $10,999 XC model. Throw in the optional $800 ABS and you’re still under the MSRP of the XC by $200.

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REVS Check Free : Don’t Get Ripped-off When Buying a Second-hand Car or Boat Privately

REVS Check Free

REVS Check Free

REVS Check Free : Don’t Risk It

REVS stands for the Register of Encumbered Vehicles. It is a statutory public register which assists the general public, the finance sector and the motor trade. The register holds information about motor vehicles and boats that have been used as security for a loan from a bank, finance company, credit union or other credit provider.

Buy a second-hand car privately that has money owing on it, and you could end up with the car being repossessed – and you won’t get your money back. It’s the law.

REVS is a free service provided by NSW Fair Trading which can tell you if the car you’re thinking of buying is carrying a debt, and could be repossessed. A free REVS check will provide you with details of any encumbrances over a vehicle. This includes stolen or wreck (write-off) information for NSW registered vehicles or, if there is any money owing on the vehicle.

What you need before you do a REVS search
From the vehicle, get the Registration Number, Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) or chassis number and Engine number. You can usually find the engine number on the engine block and the VIN number on the chassis. If you have problems finding these numbers on a car, just ask at a service station workshop, or check with the manufacturer.

Before you search REVS, check that all these numbers match the ones on the registration papers. The same applies for motorbikes. However, for trailers and caravans, just get the registration and VIN/chassis numbers. REVS cannot do a check on the Registration number only.

Ask for proof in writing
If REVS gives the vehicle the OK, you can get a Search Certificate which gives you conditional legal protection against repossession due to the previous owner’s unpaid debt.

What’s free and what’s not?
A Search Certificate costs only $14.45
, and protects you provided you finalise the purchase by midnight of the following day. The Search Certificate will protect you for as long as you own the vehicle.

 

SEVEN EASY STEPS TO FOLLOW WHEN YOU BUY A CAR PRIVATELY

  1. Ask if any money is owing on the vehicle.

  2. Get the Rego no., engine no., and vehicle ID no. (VIN) or chassis no. from the vehicle.

  3. Confirm rego no., engine no. and VIN/Chassis numbers on the vehicle match those on the registration papers.

  4. Do a vehicle search on this website with these numbers.

  5. Phone REVS to purchase a REVS Search Certificate to guard against repossession.

  6. Complete transaction before midnight the next day.

  7. Arrange for current owner to repay the debt, if one exists. REVS can tell you how to do this.

 

NSW Motor Vehicle Registration Requirements

NSW residents considering the purchase of an unregistered or interstate registered vehicle should be aware that the vehicle will require an inspection by the NSW Roads and Traffic Authority prior to registration in NSW. For further information contact the NSW RTA on 13 22 13.

 

REVS Check Free Help

Performing a REVS check on a vehicle will tell you if there is any money owing on it, if it has been stolen, if it is a wreck (write-off) or if the Police or RTA are investigating it.

If you purchase a REVS Certificate when buying a vehicle you are legally protected against having the vehicle repossessed by a finance company.

You will need the following before you can perform a REVS check:

The VIN/Chassis Number of the vehicle to be checked
The Registration Number (if any) of the vehicle to be checked
The Engine Number (if any) of the vehicle to be checked
A valid credit card if you wish to purchase a certificate

If you cannot find the VIN/Chassis number (stamped on the vehicle), contact the manufacturer. If the vehicle has a registration number or engine number, these details should be entered also.

If the vehicle being checked is unregistered you should specify this and leave the registration number blank.

If the vehicle to be checked is a caravan or trailer, be sure to select the ‘trailer or caravan’ box. Leave the engine number blank for a caravan or trailer.

If you have further queries please contact REVS on 13 32 20 or email to: support@revs.nsw.gov.au

 

REVS Check Free for Boats

What you need before you do a REVS search
From the boat, get the Registration Number, Hull Identification Number (HIN) – also known as BOATCODE – and Engine number(s), where applicable. You can usually find the HIN on the transom at the stern. If you have any problems finding these numbers on a boat, just ask at a marina service centre, or check with the manufacturer.

Before you search REVS, check all these numbers match the ones on the registration papers. The same applies for all types of vessels, yachts and boats. You can also check REVS for boat trailers on the Vehicle REVS Check page – just get the registration and VIN/chassis numbers. REVS cannot do a check on the Registration number only.

Ask for proof in writing
If REVS gives the boat the OK, you can get a Search Certificate which gives you conditional legal protection against repossession due to the previous owner’s unpaid debt.

What’s free and what’s not?
A Search Certificate costs only $14.45 if purchased over the Internet
, and protects you provided you purchase by midnight the following day. General telephone advice is free.

 

SEVEN EASY STEPS TO FOLLOW WHEN YOU BUY A BOAT PRIVATELY

  1. Ask if any money is owing on the vessel.
  2. Get the rego no., engine no.(s), and HIN or BOATCODE from the vessel.
  3. Confirm rego no., engine no.(s) and HIN or BOATCODE numbers on the vessel match those on the registration papers.
  4. Use these numbers to do a Vessel REVS check.
  5. Arrange for current owner to repay the debt, if one exists. REVS can tell you how to do this.
  6. Buy a REVS Search Certificate to guard against repossession.
  7. Complete transaction before midnight the next day.

The REVS for Boats service only covers NSW registered boats with a HIN affixed and 24 metres and under in length. Buyers of boats over 24m and/or capable of travelling in international waters should also check with the Australian Shipping Registration Office, Canberra.

 

FAQs about REVS Check Free

How can I do a REVS enquiry?

Via the Internet at www.revs.nsw.gov.au (from 2:30am to 11:45pm, 7 days a week) or by telephone on 13 32 20, weekdays 8.30am – 5.00pm and Saturday 9am – 2pm (excludes Sundays and public holidays).

What information do I need to purchase a REVS certificate?

You will need the details of the vehicle or boat that you are checking. For a motor vehicle, the VIN or chassis number, registration number (if the vehicle is registered) and the engine number (if applicable). For a boat you will need the NSW registration number, the HIN (Hull Identification Number) and the engine number(s) (if applicable).

NB. The VIN/HIN is the prime identifier of the vehicle/boat and it is critical that you provide the correct number when doing your REVS check. Failure to provide the correct number will cause your REVS certificate to be invalid.

What type of information does the REVS certificate provide?

Financial encumbrances  (i.e. money owing)

The REVS certificate will state whether or not a financial encumbrance is recorded against the vehicle or boat.   If an encumbrance is recorded, the certificate will state:-

  • the name and address of the interest holder
  • details of the vehicle or boat recorded on REVS
  • the date the interest was recorded on REVS
  • the type of interest e.g. lease, hire purchase, etc.

Other information

There may be other advisory information recorded about a vehicle or boat.  This includes –

  • Vehicles reported as stolen from NSW, Vic, SA and Qld
  • Boats reported as stolen in NSW
  • Written-off vehicle alerts from NSW
  • Other information, such as NSW registration cancellations for fine defaults.

NB: This information is advisory only, and is not guaranteed by REVS.

Does a REVS certificate cover encumbrances in other States and Territories?

Motor Vehicles.   A REVS certificate provides protection against financial encumbrances over vehicles in NSW, ACT, NT, Qld, Vic and SA.     It does not cover interests in WA or Tasmania. 

Boats.   A REVS certificate for a boat only provides protection in NSW.    If you are buying a boat registered in another State or Territory, you should also make inquiries on the encumbrance register there.

What is a written-off vehicle?

There are 2 types of written-off vehicles – a statutory write-off and a repairable write-off. A statutory write-off is a vehicle that has been damaged beyond repair and can only be sold for parts. A repairable write-off is a vehicle that is currently or has been previously written-off. The vehicle may have been repaired, inspected and reregistered.

How do I check a vehicle that isn’t registered in NSW?

NSW REVS can do a search on unregistered vehicles and those registered in NSW, the ACT, the Northern Territory, Victoria, South Australia and Queensland.

If the vehicle is registered in WA, contact WA REVS on 1300 304 024 or at www.docep.wa.gov.au/revs/. For vehicles registered in Tasmania, contact the Vehicle Securities Register on 1300 851 225 or at www.transport.tas.gov.au/regstat/index.html.

Important NoteNSW Motor Vehicle Registration Requirements: NSW residents considering the purchase of an unregistered or interstate registered vehicle should be aware that the vehicle will require an inspection by the NSW Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) prior to registration in NSW. For further information contact the NSW RTA on 13 22 12 or visit the RTA website at http://www.rta.nsw.gov.au/registration/getnewrego/index.html .

Can I check a vehicle’s history?

NSW RTA offers a service that can provide previous details of a NSW registered vehicle (incl. motorcycle). For interstate registered vehicles, contact the relevant registration authority in that state for a vehicle history check. For more details visit http://www.rta.nsw.gov.au/myrta/vehiclehistory.html

How do I check a boat that isn’t registered in NSW?

Currently NSW REVS can only check boats that are registered with NSW Maritime. Other boat registers include:

Queensland REVS 13 74 68 http://www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au/

Western Australia REVS 1300 30 40 24 www.docep.wa.gov.au/revs/

Shipping Registration Office 02 6279 5921 http://www.amsa.gov.au/Shipping_Registration/

If you can’t check the boat on REVS, please note that you may be able to check the trailer (if applicable) for financial encumbrance and stolen vehicle information.

How much does a REVS certificate cost?

A REVS certificate costs $14.10

How can I pay for a REVS certificate?

By credit card (Visa, MasterCard, Diners Club, Amex), cheque, money order or cash (cash can only be accepted at a NSW Fair Trading Centre).

How long is a certificate valid for?

A REVS certificate is valid for as long as you own the vehicle or boat, provided that you complete the purchase of the vehicle or boat before midnight of the day following issue of the certificate.

NB. The VIN/HIN is the prime identifier of the vehicle/boat and it is critical that you provide the correct number when doing your REVS check. Failure to provide the correct number will cause your REVS certificate to be invalid.

What if I have a valid REVS certificate but my car gets repossessed because of a previous owner’s debt?

You should seek independent legal advice.

How long does it take to remove an encumbrance record from REVS once the car or boat has been paid out?

Once an encumbrance has been finalised, the interest holder has 14 days in which to remove the registration from REVS.

What can I do if the interest holder takes longer than 14 days to remove the encumbrance from REVS?

You can lodge a complaint with REVS about the late cancellation of the encumbrance by downloading the form, “Complaint – Late Cancellation of Interest” from REVS website (http://www.revs.nsw.gov.au/about/appforms.htm).

Complete the form and return it to REVS, together with evidence that the debt has been paid.

What can I do if there is an encumbrance recorded against my car or boat that shouldn’t be on REVS?

Send a letter of complaint to the General Manager, REVS, PO Box 972, Parramatta NSW 2150. Please provide details of your vehicle/boat and any information relating to the encumbrance. REVS will investigate the matter and if appropriate, may issue a Show Cause Notice to the interest holder. The interest holder will be asked to ‘show cause’ why the interest should not be cancelled from the Register.

I am about to purchase a replacement engine for my car. Can a REVS check be done on an engine number only?

No, a REVS check can only be done if you provide a VIN or chassis number with the engine number.

Can REVS do a check on a motorbike?

Yes, a REVS check can be done on a motorbike by providing the VIN/chassis number, engine number and registration number (if registered).

I am thinking about buying a car/boat that has money owing on it. How can I do this without becoming responsible for the debt?

Before you buy a vehicle/boat with an encumbrance, REVS suggests you take these steps:

1. Ask the seller to obtain a payout figure in writing from the financier.

2. Ring REVS and purchase a REVS certificate for protection against repossession of the vehicle/boat due to financial interests that have not been registered with REVS.

3. Make out two (2) separate cheques – one payable to the financier for the total payout figure and the other to the seller for the balance. Never pay the seller the full amount as you have no guarantee that he/she will pay out the debt.

4. Ask the seller and financier for a receipt. It is also recommended that you obtain a copy of the letter of discharge from the financier which confirms that they no longer have an interest in the vehicle/boat. Keep this letter with your REVS certificate.

5. Make sure that you finalise the purchase of the vehicle/boat before midnight of the day after the certificate is purchased. That is, if you buy a REVS certificate on a Thursday, then you must pay for the vehicle/boat (hand over the cheques to the financier and the seller) before midnight of the Friday. This sequence of events ensures that the REVS certificate remains a valid legal document.

Please note that as financiers have 14 days in which to cancel their interests with REVS once a debt has been paid out, the certificate may still show the financial encumbrance warning even though you have paid out the debt. The letter of discharge (or copy) from the financier is proof that the seller’s debt has been paid out.

I have bought a certificate over the Internet but was unable to print it. How can I print a copy of my certificate?

Provided that you wrote down the certificate number, then click here https://online.revs.nsw.gov.au/revs/SelectCertificate.htm , enter your certificate number and VIN or chassis number and you will be able to reprint your certificate. If you didn’t have time to note down your certificate number, contact REVS by telephone on 13 32 20 or email revs@services.nsw.gov.au with details of your vehicle and the date that the certificate was purchased and we will provide you with the certificate number.

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